Nova Publicação para Cerâmica Calderon

 

Valentin Calderón figura como um dos pioneiros da arqueologia no Nordeste do Brasil. Membro do Programa Nacional de Pesquisas Arqueológicas entre as décadas de 1960 e 70, foi responsável pelos levantamentos sistemáticos nos sítios arqueológicos do estado da Bahia e identificou a tradição cerâmica Aratu. Calderón foi também o idealizador do Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia da Universidade Federal da Bahia (MAE/UFBA), que hoje salvaguarda sua coleção arqueológica e seu arquivo pessoal. Em uma parceria realizada com pesquisadores do Center for Regional Heritage Research da Stephen F. Austin University, Texas, EUA, os artefatos cerâmicos da coleção Valentin Calderón foram digitalizados através do uso de tecnologias 3D. No total, foram escaneados 27 objetos cerâmicos, dentre vasilhames e urnas funerárias. A iniciativa ofereceu subsídios para pensar a digitalização como forma de preservação, principalmente no que se refere à conservação e restauração, documentação e comunicação do acervo. Os modelos 3D resultantes do processo de digitalização permitem uma análise detalhada dos artefatos e obtenção de dados sem a manipulação direta, contribuindo de forma relevante para a preservação dos acervos. Os dados e modelos serão, em breve, disponibilizados para a pesquisa e também utilizados na nova exposição de longa duração do MAE/UFBA.

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geometric morphometrics, asymmetry, 3d, archaeology, Caddo, ceramic, pottery, analysis, deviation, 3d scan, 3d model

NAGPRA for Archeologists

For those interested in all things NAGPRA, consider attending the NAGPRA for Archeologists: Methods, Dialogue, and Technologies workshop at The Old Mint Museum in New Orleans, Louisiana August 15-18, 2017. From the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training site:

NCPTT, the friends of NCPTT, and the National NAGPRA Program will partner to offer a four-day course on the statute, regulations, requirements, and compliance aspects of NAGPRA. The objective is to introduce participants to the purpose and requirements of NAGPRA. Classroom instruction will include discussions with NAGPRA representatives from Indian tribes who will share their responsibilities and experiences. The workshop will conclude with demonstrations of innovative technologies that can be used for documenting artifacts prior to repatriation as well as for current and future research.

I will be there to discuss the work that we are doing with the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma, and to illustrate how we are capturing, analyzing and curating 3D data associated with Caddo NAGPRA materials. Further details, including the option to register for this workshop, can be found on the NCPTT website (here).

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geometric morphometrics, asymmetry, 3d, archaeology, Caddo, ceramic, pottery, analysis, deviation, 3d scan, 3d model

New Publication in  DAACH

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.daach.2017.04.003

While pursuing a study of 3D geometric morphometrics for ceramic burial vessels that often articulate with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) from the ancestral Caddo region, there have been no shortage of potentially meaningful observations, one of which–rotational asymmetry in coil-built vessels–is discussed in this publication. Using Geomagic Design X (reverse-engineering software) and Geomagic Control X (computer aided inspection software), metrics associated with rotational asymmetry were generated then analyzed.

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Vessels can be sectioned, where the deviations for a specific spline can be extracted for a more in-depth analysis.

Results indicate variable asymmetry among the different vessel shapes (i.e., bottles, jars, etc.), which may augment and strengthen studies and discussions of vessel form. Future directions include the incorporation of directional and–possibly–fluctuating asymmetry measures for the widest vessel profiles. Preliminary results point toward substantive analytical gains that can be used to augment more traditional ceramic analyses as well as geometric morphometric studies of ceramic vessel shape.

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Results of the asymmetry analysis.

In addition to the analysis of rotational asymmetry, there is a brief discussion for analyses of (directional and fluctuating) asymmetry using geometric morphometrics. While the bulk of that discussion remains the topic of another paper, the citation network for asymmetry studies that use geometric morphometrics was included in this paper, and can be accessed by clicking on the image or the link below.

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Directed bipartite citation network for studies of asymmetry using geometric morphometrics. Access the network here.

Link to the publication here, and view the 3D models of the Caddo vessels from the Washington Square Mound site here.  Links to the digital repository where you can download these data are included in the publication.

Many thanks to the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma for the requisite permissions needed to scan the vessels, and to the Anthropology and Archaeology Laboratory for access. 

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Preprint available on SocArXiv

Now available on SocArXiv – download here. The paper includes a 3D figure–preprint must be downloaded then opened in your PDF viewer to activate the 3D model. Learn more about how to interact with a 3D PDF here. Many thanks to the folks at the Open Science Framework, SocArXiv and Overleaf. This data paper is currently in review.

DOI 10.17605/OSF.IO/9YD7J | ARK c7605/osf.io/9yd7j

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3D Ceramic Vessel from the Arizona State Museum

Ceramic vessel ASM 21699; curated in the Arizona State Museum at the University of Arizona and scanned with a Creaform GoSCAN50.

Many thanks to the faculty and staff of the Arizona State Museum at the University of Arizona for the requisite permissions and access needed to scan this vessel.

Caddo Bottle from 16Sa37 in Northwest Louisiana

This Caddo bottle comes from 16Sa37 in Northwest Louisiana, is curated at the Texas Archeological Research Laboratory in Austin, Texas, and was scanned with a GoSCAN20. This vessel will be integrated into our study of Caddo vessel morphology, and these data will be made available through a data paper. Additionally, these scans will eventually be included in the Texas Archeological Society Newsletter, as we received generous funding from the Texas Archeological Society to create the scans.

In addition to those attributes associated with vessel shape, form, allometry and asymmetry, the standard suite of Caddo vessel attributes (sensu Perttula) will be included as we continue our effort to synthesize and examine macro-level trends in the Southern Caddo Area.

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Preprint available on SocArXiv

Now available on SocArXiv – download here. Click on the image of the first page below for the option to download a preprint of the data paper, and access links to the open access 3D scan data. The paper does include a 3D figure–preprint must be downloaded then opened in your PDF viewer to activate the 3D model. Learn more about how to interact with a 3D PDF here. Many thanks to the folks at the Open Science Framework, SocArXiv and Overleaf. This data paper is currently in review.

DOI 10.17605/OSF.IO/7D4K5 | ARK c7605/osf.io/7d4k5

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3D Masked Effigy Vessel from ENMU

Masked effigy vessel from the Miles Collection at Eastern New Mexico University #ENMU. This vessel, along with many others from ENMU–primarily Playas Red Wares–are the topic of a forthcoming data paper that outlines the hardware, software and methods used to collect these 3D data.

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3D Clovis Point from the Gault Site (Part 4)

This is the last of the scanned Clovis points from the Gault Site in Central Texas. Now that all of the Clovis points have been scanned, post-processed and modeled, we will begin work on a data paper where the hardware, software and methods used for data collection will be detailed. Each scan will now be uploaded to a digital repository where it will be assigned a digital object identifier (DOI) in preparation of making these data open access.

Many thanks to the Gault School of Archaeological Research and Texas State University for the Requisite permissions and access needed to generate these scans.

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3D Ceramics from the Arizona State Museum at the University of Arizona

Any time that I get to work alongside Dr. Suzanne Eckert is always a treat; so when I received an invitation to visit the Arizona State Museum at the University of Arizona to scan some ceramics for an upcoming pilot project with her, we made it happen. The vessels in question have a beveled rim/lip, and we will be looking into various ways of using the 3D data to expand upon current dialogues regarding the extent of this practice. And yes folks, those gloves are really purple.

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In addition to the ceramics, I was also able to scan a selection of Clovis points from the Murray Springs and Naco sites. All of the scans will be made available in an open access format soon.

Photos courtesy of the Arizona State Museum at the University of Arizona.

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