robert z selden jr, geometric morphometrics, ceramics, pottery, shape analysis, geomorph, r, Caddo, American Southeast, archaeology, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jasrep.2018.08.045

Preprint of new JAS: Reports article available on SocArXiv

The geometric morphometric analysis of Hickory Engraved bottles is currently in press at JAS: Reports, and the preprint is available for download on SocArXiv. The follow-up to this piece integrates a new sample of Smithport Plain Caddo bottles, and will be published in Volume 89 of the Bulletin of the Texas Archeological Society. The Hickory Engraved analysis presents an iterative extension of my ongoing work with Caddo ceramic morphology, to which new collections are regularly added. Access the preprint by clicking on the SocArXiv link above, or on the images below.

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Comparison of mean shapes for sites where Hickory Engraved assemblages were found to differ significantly; a, Gahagan Mound (gray) and Belcher Mound; b, Gahagan Mound (gray) and Crenshaw Mound; c, Gahagan Mound (gray) and Haley Place; d, Gahagan Mound (gray) and Paul Mitchell; e, Gahagan Mound (gray) and Pohler Collection; f, Smithport Landing (gray) and Paul Mitchell; and g, Smithport Landing (gray) and Pohler Collection.

This study expands upon a previous analysis of the Clarence H. Webb collection that resulted in the identification of two bottle shapes used in the manufacture of the Hickory Engraved type. The current sample of Caddo bottles adduces three-dimensional meshes from the Hickory Engraved specimens in the Webb collection, and 14 new meshes from six sites and one collection. Results confirm that in some cases Hickory Engraved bottle shapes differ significantly by site, that the two shapes identified in the Webb collection persist in this larger sample, and that morphological integration is not significant, meaning that those traits used to characterise bottle shape (rim, neck, body, and base) were not found to vary in a coordinated manner. Thus, these results do not support the hypothesis that Caddo potters adhered to a template of vessel shape associated with specific decorative motifs. When combined with the Webb sample, iterative improvements are achieved, and results demonstrate a general trend toward standardisation in Caddo bottle shapes through time.

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Comparison of mean bottle shapes by type for those types found to differ significantly in the Hickory Engraved study; (a) Belcher Engraved (gray) and Hickory Engraved, (b) Belcher Engraved (gray) and Keno Trailed, (c) Belcher Engraved (gray) and Smithport Plain, (d) Hickory Engraved (gray) and Keno Trailed, (e) Hickory Engraved (gray) and Smithport Plain, (f) Keno Trailed (gray) and Smithport Plain, (g) Keno Trailed (gray) and Taylor Engraved, and (h) Smithport Plain (gray) and Taylor Engraved.

Funding for this research was provided by the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma and the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training.

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Geometric Morphometrics of Caddo bottles in the Clarence H. Webb Collection

Analyses of ceramic vessel shape are neither new or novel; however, the relatively recent adoption of geometric morphometric (GM) methods by archaeologists provides a preview of the contribution of GM to the systematic and rigorous study of morphology as applied to material culture. This study is focused upon an analysis of Caddo bottle shapes for Belcher Engraved, Hickory Fine Engraved, Keno Trailed, Smithport Plain, and Taylor Engraved vessels from the Allen Plantation, Belcher Mound, Gahagan Mound, and Smithport Landing sites in the Clarence H. Webb collections from northwest Louisiana. Results indicate some significant relationships between bottle shape and size (allometry), bottle shape and type, and bottle shape and site. A test of morphological integration indicates that the bottles are significantly integrated, meaning that those discrete traits used to characterise their shape (rim, neck, body, and base) vary in a coordinated manner, highlighting significant integration between suites of attributes. The Smithport Plain and Hickory (Fine) Engraved bottles found at the Belcher Mound, Smithport Landing, and Gahagan Mound sites also provide evidence for two discrete (north–south) base and body shapes.

Access the article here, or by clicking on the image of the first page below.

Ceramic morphological organisation in the Southern Caddo Area: T

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Preprint of New BTAS Article Available on SocArXiv

The preprint of my forthcoming BTAS article that explores morphological variation for a sample of Smithport Plain Caddo bottles is now available for download on SocArXiv. The follow-up to this piece integrates Caddo bottles from the Bison B site in northwest Louisiana curated at Southern Methodist University. This analysis is an iterative extension of my ongoing work with Caddo ceramic morphology, to which new collections are regularly added. Each iterative improvement includes an analysis of the recently scanned ceramics, then presents the results of a subsequent analysis of the aggregated sample.

 

A Preliminary Study of Smithport Plain Bottle Morphology in the

 

Many thanks to the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma, the Williamson Museum at Northwestern State University, the Louisiana State Exhibit Museum, the Texas Archeological Research Laboratory, and the Louisiana State University (LSU) Museum of Natural Science for the requisite permissions and access needed to generate the 3D scans of the Caddo bottles used in this analysis. Development of the analytical workflow and production of 3D scans from the Clarence H. Webb collection was funded by a grant (P14AP00138) from the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training. Production of 3D scans for repatriated Caddo bottles from the Crenshaw Mound and the Pohler Collection was funded by a grant from the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma.

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Nova Publicação para Cerâmica Calderon

 

Valentin Calderón figura como um dos pioneiros da arqueologia no Nordeste do Brasil. Membro do Programa Nacional de Pesquisas Arqueológicas entre as décadas de 1960 e 70, foi responsável pelos levantamentos sistemáticos nos sítios arqueológicos do estado da Bahia e identificou a tradição cerâmica Aratu. Calderón foi também o idealizador do Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia da Universidade Federal da Bahia (MAE/UFBA), que hoje salvaguarda sua coleção arqueológica e seu arquivo pessoal. Em uma parceria realizada com pesquisadores do Center for Regional Heritage Research da Stephen F. Austin University, Texas, EUA, os artefatos cerâmicos da coleção Valentin Calderón foram digitalizados através do uso de tecnologias 3D. No total, foram escaneados 27 objetos cerâmicos, dentre vasilhames e urnas funerárias. A iniciativa ofereceu subsídios para pensar a digitalização como forma de preservação, principalmente no que se refere à conservação e restauração, documentação e comunicação do acervo. Os modelos 3D resultantes do processo de digitalização permitem uma análise detalhada dos artefatos e obtenção de dados sem a manipulação direta, contribuindo de forma relevante para a preservação dos acervos. Os dados e modelos serão, em breve, disponibilizados para a pesquisa e também utilizados na nova exposição de longa duração do MAE/UFBA.

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robert z selden jr, archaeology, archeology, geometric morphometric, ceramic, analysis, mathematics, statistics, 3d, 3d scan

New Publication in  DAACH

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.daach.2017.04.003

While pursuing a study of 3D geometric morphometrics for ceramic burial vessels that often articulate with the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) from the ancestral Caddo region, there have been no shortage of potentially meaningful observations, one of which–rotational asymmetry in coil-built vessels–is discussed in this publication. Using Geomagic Design X (reverse-engineering software) and Geomagic Control X (computer aided inspection software), metrics associated with rotational asymmetry were generated then analyzed.

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Vessels can be sectioned, where the deviations for a specific spline can be extracted for a more in-depth analysis.

Results indicate variable asymmetry among the different vessel shapes (i.e., bottles, jars, etc.), which may augment and strengthen studies and discussions of vessel form. Future directions include the incorporation of directional and–possibly–fluctuating asymmetry measures for the widest vessel profiles. Preliminary results point toward substantive analytical gains that can be used to augment more traditional ceramic analyses as well as geometric morphometric studies of ceramic vessel shape.

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Results of the asymmetry analysis.

In addition to the analysis of rotational asymmetry, there is a brief discussion for analyses of (directional and fluctuating) asymmetry using geometric morphometrics. While the bulk of that discussion remains the topic of another paper, the citation network for asymmetry studies that use geometric morphometrics was included in this paper, and can be accessed by clicking on the image or the link below.

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Directed bipartite citation network for studies of asymmetry using geometric morphometrics. Access the network here.

Link to the publication here, and view the 3D models of the Caddo vessels from the Washington Square Mound site here.  Links to the digital repository where you can download these data are included in the publication.

Many thanks to the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma for the requisite permissions needed to scan the vessels, and to the Anthropology and Archaeology Laboratory for access. 

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