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Paleoindian Archaeology and the Index of Texas Archaeology

New article published in PaleoAmerica discussing some of the Paleoindian resources available on the Index of Texas Archaeology (https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/20555563.2018.1467686?journalCode=ypal20#metrics-content).

(2018). Paleoindian Archaeology and the Index of Texas Archaeology. PaleoAmerica: Vol. 4, No. 2, pp. 95-98.

Paleoindian Archaeology and the Index of Texas Archaeology

Source: Paleoindian Archaeology and the Index of Texas Archaeology

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‘Culture and Climactic Change in Central Texas’ by Joel Gunn and Royce Mahula

https://doi.org/10.21112/ita.1977.1.20

In the following discussions the paleoecology of Central Texas will be elucidated given the present state of knowledge. Global climatic variables and modern Fredericksburg weather data are used to obtain a better understanding of climatic change. At a more specific level, the environmental characteristics of Gillespie County are studied; and, finally, the environment and culture of the Hop Hill locality are conjoined to the whole.

Source: ‘Special Report, No. 5’ by Joel Gunn and Royce Mahula

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‘1999 Reburial at Mission San Juan Capistrano, San Antonio, Texas’ by Steve A. Tomka and José E. Zapata

https://doi.org/10.21112/ita.2001.1.8

On November 15, 1999, the Center for Archaeological Research (CAR), The University of Texas at San Antonio, returned 122 curation boxes containing human remains of between 103 and 125 individuals to Monsignor Balthazar Janacek, Archdiocese Director, Old Spanish Missions. These remains had been obtained during two previous Witte Memorial Museum excavations at Mission San Juan Capistrano. Subsequently, CAR returned the majority of the burial goods associated with these human remains to Monsignor Janacek. CAR then entered into an agreement with the Archdiocese of San Antonio to locate and monitor the excavation of the two reburial areas that were to coincide with two previously excavated areas. The location and monitoring of the reburial areas began on November 22, 1999. The reburial of the human remains and associated artifacts occurred on November 27, 1999. Present at the reburial ceremony were representatives of the Archdiocese of San Antonio, the National Park Service, the American Indians of Texas at the Spanish Colonial Missions, a member of CAR, and member of the press and public.

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‘Documentation of the San Pedro Acequia (41BX337) at Trevino Street, Sa’ by I. Waynne Cox

https://doi.org/10.21112/ita.1995.1.8

In August 1994, the Center for Archaeological Research entered into a contract with the San Antonio Parks and Recreation Department to provide monitoring for the Trevino Street improvements immediately to the north of San Fernando Cathedral in downtown San Antonio. Previous investigations had shown that the stone-lined San Pedro acequia existed at the curb line on Main Avenue.

Monitoring was conducted as the street surface was removed and, as expected, the acequia was exposed. The location of the acequia was documented by photography and measured drawings. A plan map of the location was produced and archival research revealed the history of the channel at this location.

Source: ‘Documentation of the San Pedro Acequia (41BX337) at Trevino Street, Sa’ by I. Waynne Cox

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‘Test Excavations at 41HE257, Henderson County, Texas’ by E. Frances Gadus

https://doi.org/10.21112/ita.2003.1.13

Personnel from Prewitt and Associates, Inc., conducted test excavations at 41HE257, a prehistoric site located in central Henderson County. This work was conducted for the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), Environmental Affairs Division, since part of the site is within the right of way for the southern expansion of FM 317, the Athens Loop. The work was done under Texas Antiquities Permit No. 3070 and all materials collected and records generated are curated at the Texas Archeological Laboratory, The University of Texas at Austin. The excavations showed that the site is shallow and contains few lithics or ceramic artifacts, limited botanical remains, no faunal remains, and only one possible rock feature. One radiocarbon assay indicates the presence of an early Late Prehistoric component. However, that component could be mixed with earlier and later materials, and definition of discrete components is not possible. As such, the site has little capacity to yield important information and is considered ineligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places or designation as a State Archeological Landmark.

Source: ‘Test Excavations at 41HE257, Henderson County, Texas’ by E. Frances Gadus

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